Divine Freedom

Concerning the interpretation of divine freedom, Berkouwer gave this warning: “waving the banner of absolute divine autonomy does not dam up anguishing questions, and is certainly not likely to lead to praise” (A Half Century of Theology, p. 92). He did not wish to question the divine freedom. He sought to clarify its meaning in a way that “phrases like ‘incontestible freedom’ and … ‘absolute possibility'” (A Half Century of Theology, p. 91) fail to do. He insisted that the New Testament “avoids a dialectic between divine freedom and human freedom” (A Half Century of Theology, p. 101). He emphasized that divine freedom should be understood in connection with divine goodness (A Half Century of Theology, p. 91 – referring to Matthew 20:15). He maintained that divine freedom reminds man that he must not presume on divine goodness. He emphasized that divine freedom serves as “a summons to conversion” (A Half Century of Theology, p. 91 – referring to Matthew 22:14 and Matthew 20:16).

3 thoughts on “Divine Freedom

    1. Thanks, mrteague, for your comment. From ourselves, there is only bad news – we “have sinned”, and we “fall short of the glory of God.” From the Lord, there is Good News – we “are justified freely by his grace through the redemption that came by Christ Jesus” (Romans 3:23-24). God bless you.

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