Let us rejoice in Jesus, God’s Son. Let us rejoice in Jesus, our Saviour.

God’s Son, Jesus Christ our Lord” was “declared to be the Son of God with power, according to the spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead” (Romans 1:3-4).

This post is a continuation of my earlier post, “This is my Son. This is your Saviour.” You should, really, read that post before reading this one. Here’s the link.

https://learningfromgodsword.wordpress.com/2021/07/15/this-is-my-son-this-is-your-saviour/

Following on from what I’ve written in the earlier post, I will ask the question, “What does it mean to say that Jesus Christ was “declared to be the Son of God… by the resurrection from the dead”? Does it mean that he became the Son of God when he rose from the dead? No! Being declared to be the Son of God is different from becoming the Son of God. When we ask what it means to be declared the Son of God, we must ask another question, “Who declared Jesus to be the Son of God?” Was it Peter, when he preached on the day of Pentecost (Acts 2:32,36)? No! Peter preached the risen Lord, but he was doing no more than passing on the message that had been given to him by Jesus, the risen Lord. It was God who declared Jesus to be his Son “by the resurrection from the dead.”

This was not the first time that God had declared Jesus to be his Son. In the earlier post, I went back to the message that was given to Mary: “You will conceive and give birth to a son, and you are to call him Jesus. He will be great and will be called the Son of the Most High” (Luke 1:31-32). I went back to Jesus’ baptism: “a voice from heaven said, ‘This is my Son, whom I love; with him I am well pleased’” (Matthew 3:17). I went, from there, to Jesus; transfiguration: “a voice from the cloud said, ‘This is my Son, whom I love; with him I am well pleased. Listen to him!’” (Matthew 17:5). On each of these occasions, Jesus was declared to be the Son of God. In none of these verses is there the suggestion that Jesus became the Son of God at the time the words were spoken.

Another relevant verse (not mentioned in the first post) is Galatians 4:4, “When the time had fully come, God sent his Son… .” There is, here, no suggestion that Jesus became the Son of God when he was born or at some later point. We are simply told that “God sent his Son.” Another relevant verse (again, not mentioned in the first post) is John 3:16, “God so loved that he gave his only begotten Son… ” (King James Version); “God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son… ” (New International Version). Do the phrases, “only begotten Son” and “one and only Son” suggest to us that, at some point, in his life on earth, Jesus became the Son of God? or Do they lead us in the direction of saying that Jesus was, already, the Son of God when God sent him into the world?

Why is the resurrection of Jesus highlighted, in Romans 1:3-4, as the great declaration that Jesus is the Son of God?

What are we to say about the other declarations (the angel’s message, the voice from heaven at Jesus’ baptism and his transfiguration)?

They are remarkable, but none of them (taken separately or taken together) can be compared with the raising of Jesus from the dead. These earlier declarations came at specific points in Jesus’ journey: before his birth (this is, really, a prophecy or promise), his baptism and his transfiguration. Jesus’ resurrection comes after the completion of Jesus’ journey. In this sense, it is the completion of what God says to us about Jesus’ earthly journey. He says to us, ‘This is my Son. This your Saviour.” It is the declaration that stands out, above and beyond the earlier declarations.

We look back to Jesus’ resurrection. We look forward to the day when he “will come again” (John 14:3). This will be the final declaration that Jesus is God’s Son and our Saviour. Then, there will be no more asking the question, “Is Jesus, really, the Son of God?” We will rejoice, forever, in Jesus, God’s Son. We will rejoice, forever, in Jesus, our Saviour.

One thought on “Let us rejoice in Jesus, God’s Son. Let us rejoice in Jesus, our Saviour.

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